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Is Project Management Certification Valuable?

Good Day All

Introduction

“Certification is a must!”

“Certification is valuable!”

“Certification nice but does not add significant value!”

“Eliminate the accidental project manager – certify them”

“Certification is required”

There are too many arguments and positions on the value of certifications so what is reality, if there is one? The reality is limited to one fact: there is no agreement on the value of certification; at least in the domain of project management.Get more details about https://experiencecertification.com/

What Do We Know

What we know is that there are numerous project management certifications, such as PMP, RMP, PRINCE2, MSP, IPMA (four levels), CCC/CCE, PSP, EVP, CPM, and numerous others with all kind of acronyms. We also know that some are specialized in a topic; some are more popular; and some are more valuable. Which is which and how do we define value? Here is where the debate starts.

A few more questions:

Should human resource managers and executives use professional certification as a filter to screen candidates?

Is certification an indicator of excellence or a proof of expertise?

Are the ‘certified’ individuals able to play an active role in transforming organizational performance?

At least is project management certification contributing to enhancing organizational performance?

We can post many more questions here and to answer them effectively and fairly, we are likely in need of a large volume instead of a short article and we need numerous contributors to make the case for-and-against. Once again, what is clear is that there no consensus in the project management professional community on the value of certification, or at least on the value of some of the common and even popular certifications.

What Are The Common Views?

We can categorize the most common views per the following:

Some professionals, training providers, and even professional associations will defend the various introductory certifications and continue to promote them as “expert” level certifications and use terms such as “best practices” and “master project management”… The level of promotion is directly link to the benefit of the promoter and can often border the unethical behavior; or at least misguided.

Other professionals will attack these introductory certifications as worthless, or use terms such as: “paper certifications”, “technical ___”, and my favorite “can recite the standard verbatim but cannot manage a hot dog stand. Here again, this practice can be unethical if the attackers have competing products and/or have hidden agendas; so they try to lift their products by attacking the competing products.

Other professionals are in between and will offer a somewhat balanced view, with open and clear position and transparency of their affiliations.

It is quite difficult and might be inappropriate to judge the various professional certifications and we will not do so; this is a huge topic and we are not qualified to offer such judgment. However, in the area of project management we do have extensive global expertise to allow us to offer a professional opinion although likely controversial.

What Is Our Position?

We will state the following:

Most, if not all, certifications requires significant effort to achieve and do result in gained knowledge.

For those with proper experience, a certification may add significant value since these professionals can put a formal knowledge structure to what they have been practicing on the job.

We think that most will not argue with this statement: some certifications have significant value, others do not, and it is important to realize the difference.

Some certifications have had good value but have lost it or are losing their value although their numbers continue to grow. Sound like a contradictory statement and maybe it is but we will argue otherwise.

There is a huge gap in practice and awareness on the value of certifications in the market. This is usually the result of overzealous marketing, and as we mentioned earlier on bordering unethical behaviors.

Unfortunately, some professional associations are more concerned with growing their numbers rather than clearly communicating the true value of each certification they grant or spend the necessary screening effort to ensure qualified individuals earn the right certification.

Some certifications are introductory or early career but they are ‘sold’ as expert level.

Some are general certifications for someone with project management experience (although limited) but are ‘sold’ as project manager’s certification.

Most introductory certifications have good value as introductory level but not they are necessarily an indicator that the holder of such certification is an experienced project manager.

The Question of Value

Due to some of the factors that we mentioned earlier, many technical professionals with limited or no ex

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